Éliane Radigue – Occam Delta XV for string quartet

Binaural Audio-Production (headphones recommended!)
Studio Talk 2 about Éliane Radigue

View of the auditorium ceiling in the Haus der Berliner Festspiele before the renovation in 2010

View of the auditorium ceiling in the Haus der Berliner Festspiele before the renovation in 2010

© Berliner Festspiele, photo: Kordula Rüter

Available from 25 March to 30 June 2021

Éliane Radigue
Occam Delta XV
for string quartet (2018)

Cast

Quatuor Bozzini
Clemens Merkel violin
Alissa Cheung violin
Stéphanie Bozzini viola
Isabelle Bozzini cello

Recorded on 7.3.2021 in Espace Aline-Letendre (Église du Gesù), Montréal

Binaural Microphones and Sound Engineer placement of Eliane Radigue's „Occam Delta XV” recordings at Espace Aline-Letendre (Église du Gesù), Montréal.

Binaural Microphones and Sound Engineer placement of Eliane Radigue's „Occam Delta XV” recordings at Espace Aline-Letendre (Église du Gesù), Montréal.

© Nicholas Godmaire

Positions

  • 0 – Central Position
  • 1 – Terry Nzau
  • 2 – Françoise Isabelle Lessard
  • 3 – Mathieu Bélanger
  • 4 – André Belzile
  • 5 – Emmanuelle Majeau
  • 6 – Valérie Gariépy
  • 7 – Philippe-Aubert Gauthier
  • 8 – Kévin Kenler
  • 9 – Christopher Prince

This binaural audio production, especially produced for MaerzMusik’s 2021 online edition, presents Éliane Radigue’s “Occam Delta XV” in a yet unheard manner: Quatuor Bozzini performs the half-hour long string quartet in the presence of ten listeners, fitted with binaural microphones and distributed around the quartet in Montréal’s Église du Gesù (observing physical distance). Each binaural recording thus captures a unique spatial experience of Radigue’s composition – a listening experience that mirrors the sonic depth of Radigue’s music with high spatial resolution.

“Occam Delta XV” has been composed with and for Quatuor Bozzini. It is part of Radigue’s extensive “Occam” cycle of instrumental compositions. Its large spectrum of vibrating undulations is inspired by a mythical ocean found in David Duncan’s (1913 – 1999) science-fiction novel, “Occam’s Razor”, as well as by William of Ockham’s (ca. 1288 – 1347) influential methodological principle expressed most succinctly in his own words, “The simplest, the best.”