Exhibition Overview

Takeover

Read all exhibition texts during or after your visit to the show and learn more about the seven artistic positions.

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A child holds a sheet with a drawing in front of his face

© Stiftung Brandenburger Tor, photo: Amelie Losier

Khansa Humeidan

The exhibition as a game – that was the idea of the "Owls" class of the Heinrich von Stephan Gemeinschaftsschule in Berlin-Moabit for Takeover. The artist Khansa Humeidan gave form to this idea.

“Elephant, cat and mouse experience adventures together. With the collected resources, they want to build a house. At least two players begin together on the Start square and take turns drawing one of the five large playing cards. Elephant means move three squares, cat move two squares, mouse move one square. When you draw one of the cards with resources – foam puffs or toothpicks – you get one point. When you get to an Event circle, you can draw an event card. You gain or lose points through the events. When you reach the last square, count your points. Depending on how many points you have, take a bag of foam puffs and toothpicks from the shelf (less than 70 points: “Elephant” bag, less than 100 points: “Cat” bag, more than 100 points: “Mouse” bag). Now you can design your own “Bau” (house).”
— Amaya, Angelika, Arild, Aurelian, Béla, Cem, Efecan, Ela Su, Emir, Jakob, Jasmina, Joana, Kiran, Liona, Madiha, Mateo, Momo, Niklas, Oskar, Paulex, Zoe, Ewan, Yusuf

Khansa Humeidan (*1986, Moscow, Russia) is an artist and art educator from Syria. There she received her degree in Visual Communications at the University of Fine Art in Damascus. She subsequently completed the Art in Context Master’s program at the Universität der Künste, Berlin. She focuses on artistic work with diverse groups in different institutions. This has included the conception and implementation of art educational formats like performative audio guides at the Staatliche Museen zu Berlin and the co-development of the project Spielclub Oranienstraße 25, a playable city model exhibited at the nGbK, Berlin, 2019–2020.

Takeover, Exhibition view

Takeover, Exhibition view

© Stiftung Brandenburger Tor, photo: Amélie Losier

Takeover, Exhibition view

Takeover, Exhibition view

© Stiftung Brandenburger Tor, photo: Amélie Losier

Susanne Kriemann

Mngrv

Photography and Mystery – this was the theme developed by students of the 48th Primary School in Pankow for their contribution to the exhibition Takeover. Susanne Kriemann's series Mngrv (2018–2020) is the artistic work they chose.

“Mangroves can also grow in the water, the water washes up and down. The mangrove forest is mysterious and unknown. The mangroves are full of nets, knotted ropes, masks. Susanne Kriemann printed on the picture with rubbish that she collected in the mangroves. You can do it yourself. The pictures show how nature is treated. They are beautiful and sad.”
— Alma, Christian, Kaya, Lena, Merle, Olivia, Parnia, Siri, Toni, Veronika

Susanne Kriemann (*1972, Erlangen, Germany) investigates the medium of photography in the context of social history and archival practices. With an emphasis on ecology, she conceives of the world as a “recording system” for processes produced by humans. Kriemann’s work has been shown worldwide, including at CCA Wattis Institute for Contemporary Art, San Francisco; Kunsthalle Wien; Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam; Kunsthalle Winterthur; NTU Centre for Contemporary Art Singapore; Salonul de proiecte, Bucharest. She participated in the eleventh Shanghai Biennale, the tenth Gothenburg Biennale, the fifth Moscow Biennale and the fifth Berlin Biennale. Kriemann is a professor of art photography at the Hochschule für Gestaltung Karlsruhe and co-founder of the artist initiative ABA (AiR Berlin Alexanderplatz).  susannekriemann.info

Lisa Rave

Europium

Water and light – the students of the 6A class of the Carl-Humann-Primary-School in Berlin-Prenzlauer Berg devoted their contribution to the Takeover exhibition to this theme. They chose to present Lisa Rave's video work Europium (2014). Together with the artist, the designer Joseph Lanzinger and the speakers Clara Maria Rave and Lotte Anita Jürgensen, they created a virtual glossary of the work for young viewers. Also on display is a Goethe lamp borrowed from the Oceania exhibition at the Humboldt Forum Berlin.  To the glossary

“The country Papua New Guinea was colonised by the Germans in the late 19th century. Lisa Rave’s film tells a story about old and new colonisers versus Indigenous people and their natural resources. Europeans tried to buy goods from the Tolai, with forged tabu (shell money). Later, they also found the rare-earths europium there, with which the colonialised could make their own money forgery-proof. Europium is also used to make high-resolution monitors. In order not to destroy nature, we need to accumulate less devices.”
— Anton, Anton, Denis, Elisabeth, Fanny, Flora, Jakob Frederik, Jonas, Laurens, Luka, Milla, Nina, Niklas, Ngoc Anh Melanie, Noam Kentaro, Paula, Ruben, Steven, Yannis-Luca

Lisa Rave (*1979, Guildford, UK) is an artist and filmmaker. She interweaves layers of image and text to look at the interaction between recurring patterns of history and culture, economy, and ecology. She studied experimental film at the Universität der Künste Berlin and photography at Bard College, New York. She was a fellow at the Thyssen-Bornemisza Art Contemporary (TBA21) – Akademie, der Kunsthochschule für Medien in Cologne and the Akademie Schloss Solitude, Stuttgart. Her work has been shown at the Kunstmuseum Basel; Berlinische Galerie; Centre for Fine Arts | Bozar, Brussels, MOMAD Museum of Modern Art Dubrovnik; mumok - Museum moderner Kunst Stiftung Ludwig, Vienna; NTU Centre for Contemporary Art, Singapore; Transmediale, HKW, Berlin (2019) and Toronto Biennial of Art (2019), among others. Rave currently teaches at the Academy of Fine Arts Nuremberg.  lisarave.eu

Takeover, Exhibition view

Takeover, Exhibition view

© Stiftung Brandenburger Tor, photo: Amélie Losier

Takeover, Exhibition view

Takeover, Exhibition view

© Stiftung Brandenburger Tor, photo: Amélie Losier

Vanessa Farfán

The wondrous life of broken computers – in times of lockdown and home-schooling, students at the Carl-Humann-Primary-School in Berlin-Prenzlauer Berg explored this topic artistically. Vanessa Farfán led these workshops and created a multifaceted new work for the exhibition Takeover.

“When you dissect and look at the parts that are in a computer individually, you wouldn’t think they belong to a computer: bubbles, colours, structures. Some things look different than they appear at first glance. This is also true of Vanessa’s artwork. It’s like sorting through the images of reality, like waking up again.”
— Anton, Benas, Carl, Denis, Elisabeth, Fanny, Feline, Flora, Henrik, Jonas, Laurens, Lena, Levy, Luka, Ngoc Anh Melanie, Mieka, Niklas, Nina, Noam Kentaro, Paula, Pepe, Ruben, Sercan, Steven, Yannis-Luca

Vanessa Farfán's (*1977, Mexico City, Mexico) experimental artistic thought and practice addresses the impact of digitalisation on human perception and decision-making. She focuses on the function of errors as critical junctures of human-digital interaction. Her experience as a lighting and set designer for theatre and dance since the early 2000s informs her drawings, light installations, performances and participatory interventions. Farfán studied at the Fine Arts Institute in Mexico City and earned her Master’s degree at the Kunsthochschule Berlin-Weißensee. She is currently a doctoral candidate in the Department of Art at the Bauhaus-Universität Weimar. She has exhibited work at the Museum FLUXUS+, Potsdam; Cultural Exhibition Center, Peking and Madou Plaza Tower, Brussels, among others.  vanessafarfan.de

Michelle-Marie Letelier

Movement and shadow – art with these elements interested the 6B class of the Carl-Humann-Primary-School in Berlin-Prenzlauer Berg. They chose Michelle-Marie Letelier's Narratives of Energy Sway as their contribution to the exhibition Takeover.

“Michelle-Marie Letelier works with copper and coal, important materials for our energy supply. Mining them destroys nature. But there is also light. We thought about how to hang it in different arrangements. It’s a bit like magic. But a lot of work goes into it. Michelle-Marie transforms energy. The contrast between darkness and light gives us hope.”
— Aeon Salome, Benas, Carl Johann, Emma-June, Hedi Ada, Helene Maria, Henrik, Justin Toni, Justus Franz, Lena, Levy, Ismael, Veit, Lilly, Maja, Maria Elisabeth, Mariia, Marla, Nika, Feline, Mieka, Mirjam, Paul Ludwig, Pepe, Sercan, Tonio

Michelle-Marie Letelier (*1977, Rancagua, Chile) experiments with processes of chemical and physical transformation that produce artworks in their own right. They deal with the emergence of these processes outside of controlled forms and the mining industry. Her installations, photographs, videos, drawings, and objects result from thoroughly interdisciplinary research at sites of resource exploitation and speculation. Letelier received her Bachelor’s degree from the Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile. Her work has been exhibited internationally at the Tabakalera, San Sebastián; Or Gallery, Vancouver; Kunstmuseum Bonn; Stanislavsky Electrotheatre, Moskow; Screen City Biennial 2019, Stavanger; Bienal Sur 2017, Buenos Aires; El Museo de Los Sures, New York; CGAC, Galician Contemporary Art Centre, Santiago; 5th Mercosur Biennial, Porto Alegre, among others.  michellemarieletelier.net

Takeover, Exhibition view

Takeover, Exhibition view

© Stiftung Brandenburger Tor, photo: Amélie Losier

Takeover, Exhibition view

Takeover, Exhibition view

© Stiftung Brandenburger Tor, photo: Amélie Losier

Jan Peter Hammer

The Scream

A really dark room – this was the wish of the "Falcons” class of the Heinrich von Stephan Gemeinschaftsschule in Berlin-Moabit for the exhibition Takeover. Therefore, they chose Jan Peter Hammer's The Scream (2015) from his series Monarchs, Humans & Monsters.

“Dark nights of shadows, monsters and ghosts / Scary Face, the man in the mask, like in the horror movie / Everything is evil except the evil / A SCREAM shatters the silence / Night at the Museum / Somewhere in Norway / I am scared and frightened / All the people think I’m scary / And you say: Let’s be scary friends!”
— Alala Mee-Amazone, Ali, Alidzhan, Anna, Ekin, Elijah, Fatima, Finn, Hussein, Julian, Karim, Lauryn, Liv, Malin, Mohamad, Moutaz, Oskar, Kayra, Rukaja, Tudor, Vanesa, Zahraa

Jan Peter Hammer (*1970, Kirchheim unter Teck, Germany) began his artistic work with a strong interest in film theory and literature. In addition to objects and installations, he has produced films, videos, short dramas, political polemics and documentary and essayistic films. Recurring themes in his work are inequality, incarceration, behavioural psychology, digitalisation and neoliberalism. In 2016, he was selected as an artistic research fellow (Ph.D.) at the KHiO – Oslo National Academy of the Arts, Norway. Hammer has exhibited his work at the Kunstmuseum Basel; Bergen Assembly 2019; 69. Berlinale; MACBA, Barcelona; 14. Istanbul Biennale and Yerba Buena Center for the Arts, San Francisco, among others.  jphammer.de

Egill Sæbjörnsson

All the fun to be creeped out – this is what the students of the "Toucans" class of the Heinrich von Stephan Gemeinschaftsschule in Berlin-Moabit wanted for their contribution to the exhibition. They invited Egill Sæbjörnsson and his trolls Ūgh and Bõögâr to be part of Takeover.

“WARNING: TROLLS EAT TOURISTS! The trolls go by the names Ūgh and Bõögâr. We suspect Egill Sæbjörnsson of bringing them here. If you see either of the two trolls, please report them immediately! And if you hear screaming tourists, run for your life. And if you can’t tell the difference between tourists and other people, you should definitely run away from any kind of scream. But don’t forget to look at the art of the trolls. BE CAREFUL!”
— Alexander, Aleyna, Amalia, Amelie Luise, Carlo Younes, Fadilah, Felix Denis, Fenja, Hadi, Jakob Johann, Janko Fritjof, Josephine, Joshua Matteo, Kuzey Ergül, Laetitia, Marc, Miguel, Monika, Naelle, Rozerin, Timo, Timo Paolo, Tolou Victoria, Yelysei

Egill Sæbjörnsson (*1973, Reykjavik, Island) is an artist and musician with a background in painting. He is interested in the connection between mental and physical reality. Although his video installations and performance work are humorous and playful on the surface, they always also pursue deeper philosophical questions. Sæbjörnsson has exhibited at the Hamburger Bahnhof, Berlin; Frankfurter Kunstverein; National Gallery, Prague; The Watermill Center, New York; König Galerie, Berlin, and the Reykjavik Art Museum, among others. He was nominated for the Carnegie Art Award in 2010 and represented Iceland at the 57th Venice Biennale in 2017. His architectural installation at the Robert Koch Institute in Berlin was the first permanent, self-generating video installation in an outdoor space in Germany.  egills.de

Takeover, Exhibition view

Takeover, Exhibition view

© Stiftung Brandenburger Tor, photo: Amélie Losier